The hidden potential of urban horticulture

Our latest research, published March 2020 in Nature Food, demonstrates that urban land could grow fruit and veg for 15% of the population. Read more here:

https://www.nature.com/articles/s43016-020-0045-6

Edmondson, J.L., Cunningham, H., Densley Tingley, D.O., Dobson, M. C., Grafius, D. R., Leake, J. R., McHugh, N., Nickles, J., Phoenix, G. K., Ryan, A. J., Stovin, V., Taylor Buck, N., Warren, P. H. & Cameron, D. D. The hidden potential of urban horticulture. Nat Food 1, 155–159 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s43016-020-0045-6

Published by

Miriam Dobson

PhD researcher at the University of Sheffield. Soil, urban food, allotments, ecosystem services.

One thought on “The hidden potential of urban horticulture”

  1. Hello Miriam. I’ve been following your research through press articles. You are quite right about the potential. The key issue in realising that potential is always willing hands, of which there are plenty at present! I did an MA in Public Policy and Ageing when I was on the staff at King’s College London, and as part of that played around with the idea that the problems of urban sustainability and population ageing could be addressed together in encouraging older people to cultivate allotments – they have always been the mainstay demographic on allotments anyway, albeit that that undermines the logic behind the 1908 Act. I’ll see if I can dig out the draft paper I gave on this at a gerontology conference in Hong Kong a decade ago: there were some useful references in there I think to ageing and environment.
    Richard Wiltshire [cheerfully self-isolating in a shed at Dartford Road Allotments in Dartford Kent: Author of LGA allotment good practice guides “A Place to Grow” and “Growing in the Community”]

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